We are starting our BTS project ‘Associations between the Stomatognathic Adaptive Motor System (SMAS) and Sports (Re)Injury in Elite Athletes’ in January 2015 in collaboration with the Physical Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine Faculty, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium).

WANT TO PARTICIPATE? 80 SUBJECTS IN THE TEST GROUP WILL BE SELECTED FROM SOCCER PLAYERS AND OTHER TOP ATHLETES (M/F). SIGN UP NOW BY FILLING OUT THE FORM BELOW FOR PARTICIPATION IN THIS RESEARCH PROJECT AND RECEIVE FREE PERSONAL ADVICE ABOUT YOUR TMJ ACTIVITY IN RELATION TO (RE)INJURIES AND SPORTS INJURY SUSCEPTIBILITY.

Background information
It is well known that dental occlusion influences posture and plays a major part in the neurological balance of muscular and postural systems. A relationship between dental occlusion and injury or re-injury symptoms is shown by a dysfunctional occlusion (malocclusion) creating effects throughout the body (Fonder)[1]. This pilot study examined the correlation between occlusal function and the tendency for sports injury and re-injury susceptibility to increase. The researchers expected the tendency for sports re-injuries and increased sports injury susceptibility to be closely related to the dental occlusion and spatial awareness of the entire body. In this study functional information was collected and measured for neuromuscular alterations induced by occlusal contact. The starting point of this study was the stomatognathic motor adaptive syndrome (SMAS) according to Douglas, C.R, et. al.,[2] which describes the motor response and the adaptive processes it induces. Malocclusion causes the mandible to move laterally, or more commonly distally, in order to reach an intercuspal position. Condylar displacements are a result of these movements. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) receptors respond to the capsular mechanical stress and the information reaches the trigeminal sensory nuclei. The modified mandibular position seems to be important and may interfere with catecholaminergic neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. The main motor responses are increased jaw muscle tone, decreased velocity of movements and reduced coordination.

Research question
Can dental malocclusions be interpreted as a risk factor for the entire musculoskeletal, postural and movement system of the body? Can this be particularly important in (developing) performance, sports injury susceptibility and re-injury of soccer players and other athletes? Another one of the study’s objectives is to examine the interplay of these parameters to provide scientific information for a comprehensive diagnosis that can lead to appropriate therapy.







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